Posts filed under ‘largest printer in Arizona’

Prisma Graphic utilizes Web to Print Technology

According to Wikipedia: Web-to-print, also known as Web2Print or remote publishing, is a commercial prepress process that bridges the gap between digital content online and commercial print production. This process allows a print house, a client, and possibly a graphic designer to create, edit, and approve computer-based online templates during the prepress phase. Web to print is a technology to help business owners create a consistent brand image and build loyalty with their clients.

Prisma Graphic as a Web to Print Company

Prisma Graphic is not just a web to print company; with our exclusive Dokshop; but a print empowering company. Dokshop gives business owners control over their image through their print materials and collateral marketing efforts.

By utilizing Dokshop, companies can have their own business printing portal with access from anywhere.

The Dokshop services lets you sign in and create your custom portal with your images and marketing materials. Marketing Directors, managers, or employees can access company approved marketing materials with just a click of the mouse. Choose your template and add your text and we will print it for you and have it delivered to your location. We make web to print easy.

Let us show you how easy it is to set up your custom portal with an online web-to-print demonstration today.

June 15, 2010 at 1:50 pm Leave a comment

Web to Print Marketing Material From Customized Portals: Anytime, Anywhere, ACCURATELY

Powerful web-to-print marketing solutions are revolutionizing marketing efficiency and accountability. Around-the-clock access to pre-approved corporate collateral enables customers, franchisees and sales teams to have immediate access to the tools they need to create successful marketing campaigns quickly, easily and accurately.

DokShop is one such marketing collateral management solution that offers online proofing technology that reduces production time. With DokShop your company can have their own online catalog of customizable printed materials ready to order. Each site can be branded for individual clients.

1. Coordinate worldwide marketing efforts
2. View and download PDF proofs
3. Access powerful, dynamic reports and receive email updates
4. Assign administrators to monitor and approve orders
5. Define and analyze cost centers

According to Prisma Graphic owner, Bob Anderson, gone are the days that it takes seven touch points to get a business card printed…”For a general job like ordering a business card, first you tell your secretary, they ask the marketing department, it has to be called in and then a sales person takes an order. It gets typeset, proofed, and then goes to print,” The heartburn and headache that used to keep marketing gatekeepers awake at night is completely alleviated through this technology.

Working smarter through the use of templates and web-to-print portals, allows organizations to cut down on unnecessary print overages, inaccuracies, brand band-aids, and design paralysis. Consider how much collateral your company prints. Chances are, you have ongoing needs for stationery, forms, marketing materials, and much more.

Anderson said the technology enables projects to move four times as fast through the system. It also tracks projects, similarly to the way a package to be delivered by UPS can be tracked on the Internet.

Whether your company is large or small, modifying and managing those materials can be a time-consuming and expensive process. Simplify corporate processes by utilizing DokShop.

At Make-A-Wish, a non-profit that grants the wishes of kids with life-threatening illnesses, director of brand communications, Mike Pressendo uses DokShop.com to help mange the communication output of 72 chapters. “I want to maintain continuity of the brand across all our markets. This technology allows me to do that and then allows the chapters to localize it. But I don’t want them monkeying with fonts and headlines. With this, I can keep the overall look and feel the same across the board.”

Pressendo said the technology creates a huge financial savings, allows for better quality control and saves time. “This allows us to preserve and promote our brand, “ he said. “We’ve had other printers, but they couldn’t keep up with our technological requirements.”

This online service is a streamlined, cost-effective way to order and print all your business materials. Since 2001, businesses around the country have used DokShop to improve turn-around time, reduce human error, and ensure brand continuity. DokShop is fully customizable and enables both internal employees and distribution networks to order personalized collateral.

Corporate brands remain protected, yet promoted according to universal guidelines within local markets, increasing the relevance of the message to the target market and improving marketing performance.

Marketing accuracy has never been more qualified. Log onto DokShop.com today for a demo – and a better night’s rest!

June 9, 2010 at 7:03 pm Leave a comment

Prisma Graphics: Top Marketing Supply Chain Provider

Recently, American Executive did an article showcasing us, Prisma Graphic, a local Phoenix commercial printer. The article interviewed Bob Anderson, owner of Prisma Graphics since 2001, regarding how the company has been able to stay in the top 10% of commercial printers nationally.

There have been two key things that can be attributed to Prisma Graphic’s success in the printing industry. The first was its people. Anderson said the 28 employees working for the company in 2000 were well known for their high-quality standards. Today, 22 of those employees are still with the company, and although Prisma now employs 130 people, that dedication to quality still remains. For example, the majority of Dokshop’s business has come through referrals, Anderson said.

Second, the team suggested working with the client’s marketing department online rather than by phone and fax. Back then, there were no available software programs allowing for that kind of collaboration, so the company’s internal developers created a program of their own, and Dokshop was born.

Dokshop has enabled large corporate clients to have the brand protected by using Prisma Graphic for their collateral marketing material. The company even handles warehousing, fulfillment, and inventory management for clients, tracking and delivering orders as needed. And, as companies continue to reduce marketing budgets and head counts, Anderson predicts the demand for these services will grow.

Read the entire article to find out how Prisma has succeeded and continued to grow in the down economy and how they are using innovative web to print products such as Dokshop and their new designer product, PrintPower, to stay on top.

American Executive article: Prisma Graphic: Open to Opportunities

June 7, 2010 at 2:19 pm Leave a comment

How we React to Color – Tips for Commercial Printing

Even in the wilds of nature, color plays an intensive role in behavior, attraction and aversion. Color is informative. It tells a creature whether or not something is probably safe to eat, as well as whether or not another creature is weakened, sickly or healthy. Color has the power to alter moods. Softer oceanic colors can soothe frazzled nerves, high energy neon colors dazzle and delight the night life crowds, and power colors adorn the workspaces of professionals that understand the profound effect their surroundings can have on their productivity and focus. With so much to be communicated via proper coloration, and with certain tasks being better suited to certain colors, any professional working in commercial printing would do well to put extensive thought into the subtle or explosive messages they are sending with the palette they select for each project.

Successful commercial printing first requires a clear and goal-oriented identification of the overall mood or schema of the project at hand. Publishing with the intent to advertize will usually require a far different set of shades than that required by publishing with the intent to inform. Taking a moment beforehand to clearly define the project goals and intentions will pay dividends down the road in terms of successful and relevant visual themes.

Once the goals are defined, it’s time to choose the best colors for the particular job. Advertizing material, which is always designed to be eye-catching and visually distinct from information surrounding it, benefits greatly from oppositional colors that create strong contrast to the human eye, and thereby increased reactive interest. Notice how often advertizing materials feature dichromatic balloons, banners, or bubbles in yellow and red.

Because these two colors are naturally strong signals for the human brain, due to their wide prevalence in the wild as indicators of food edibility or the shock of blood, they cast a powerful spell all their own upon modern readers. At the same time, their placements on the light spectrum cause them to be mutually enhancing. Red and yellow trimmed informational boxes are even more noticeable than either solid red boxes or solid yellow boxes.

The overall effect achieved by these two colors when synthesized by the human brain is one of heightened attention. Countless other such combinations exist, each with their own varying thematic message. Deep greens, when commingled with dark or soft browns suggest earthy peacefulness, growth and the natural world.

Tinkering with these combinations and allowing time for various color themes to show their ultimate thematic effects can greatly enhance any commercial printing project. Likewise, identifying the target audience of any particular publication and making educated guesses as to their thematic expectations or moods will increase the overall effectiveness of assembled content. Brochures designed to woo potential retirees to a beach community, for example, should display the area being promoted in soft, relaxing, pleasant hues. A mixture between the tranquil blue comfort of sea and sky and the entrancing sherbet swirls of a sunset will strongly deliver the message that it’s time to buy tickets.

April 25, 2010 at 8:32 am Leave a comment

Are All Your “Marketing Eggs” in One Basket?

Email is part of our daily lives and definitely not a fad that is going away. Carefully managing mailboxes and email habits is on every CEO’s mind as billions of dollars are lost in productivity each year.

A typical information worker who sits at a computer all day turns to his e-mail program more than 50 times and uses instant messaging 77 times, according to one measure by RescueTime, a company that analyzes computer habits. The company, which draws its data from 40,000 people who have tracking software on their computers, found that on average the worker also stops at 40 Web sites over the course of the day.
According to a New York Times article, “The fractured attention comes at a cost. In the United States, more than $650 billion a year in productivity is lost because of unnecessary interruptions, predominately mundane matters,” according to Basex. The firm also reports, “A big chunk of that cost comes from the time it takes people to recover from an interruption and get back to work.”

Now more than ever, putting your marketing eggs into one “viral” basket is not sound advice for business success.

As marketers trying to reach customers virally, we can safely assume that they are already drowning in viral messaging and that their inbox will only continue to get bigger. What we don’t know is if our audience is using technology to its fullest capacity, or drowning in message overload.

Regardless, this puts the burden of effective communications on the shoulders of marketers. Marketing messages must, therefore, at the very least be:

  • Fully integrated
  • Highly creative
  • Genuine
  • Valuable to customer

This means that a balance between traditional marketing and viral marketing must be constantly analyzed for consistency, functionality and overall success.

The balance between the old and new is important because one is predictable and the other isn’t. There are people that will tell you that it is possible to create a viral campaign that will be hugely successful, but according to David Meerman Scott, author of The New Rules of Viral Marketing, the vast majority of agencies making such claims, almost always fail. Why? Because viral marketing requires luck, good timing, and can’t be forced.

Hence, the need to maintain a traditional marketing campaign in conjunction with all viral attempts. If you haven’t already, meet with the key decision makers of your company and define your “baseline balance.”

Keep in mind, balance is key, but so is agility! Be prepared to fail, make changes, succeed, make changes, fail, make more changes, succeed…and so on!

Photo provided by: intersectionconsulting

April 23, 2010 at 11:57 am 2 comments

Essentials of Call to Action for Commercial Printing Marketing

When it comes to commercial printing, a call to action is an essential marketing concept. Call to action refers to a request made on behalf of the advertiser for the prospect, or potential customer, to do something in regards to a product or service. Basically, an advertiser issues an effective call to action in order to persuade a buyer to move closer toward making an actual purchase. Understanding and effectively employing this concept is absolutely essential to directing a successful marketing or advertising campaign, and a good call to action answers the following question in the mind of the advertisement’s reader: “That’s interesting. Now what do I do?”

Commercial printing applications for the call to action concept are as diverse as the possible mediums for advertising. Web to print applications could include buttons that visitors click in order to begin purchasing a good or service. Web to print applications above all others, in fact, require a sound understanding and implementation of this concept, considering the sheer volume of retail business being done on the internet every second.

In terms of hard copy media, some examples of effective calls to action include instructions for a customer to call an 800 number in order to discuss the product with a company representative. Coupon campaigns in local supermarket pamphlets or direct mailing packets are another effective call to action, as they inspire customers to directly seek out the goods and services that are being discounted. In terms of the internet, every time an advertisement mentions a website to be visited for more information, they are essentially issuing a call to action.

To this end, it is the responsibility of the marketer to drum up fresh and exciting ways to issue effective calls to action to their customer base as well as new prospects. A local business owner could promote a new opening by distributing materials that advertise rock-bottom opening specials so long as patrons come within a certain small window of time.

Successful web-based marketing campaigns have used the full spectrum of today’s available technology to reach customers at home and on the go. Offering free content such as ringtones, pictures or music in exchange for the telephone numbers of customers that SMS or text a certain number via a cell phone is one way that clever marketers are generating current and active customer data.

Specifically to the realm of the web, today the name of the game is free give-away content or service. Many successful sites offer a compelling web or information based service at two simultaneous levels. New users that register using basic personal information are eligible to use the service at a basic level for free, but may be restricted to a certain number of uses per day or bandwidth constrictions, for example. Once they are thusly introduced to the service, customers often opt to pay a flat monthly fee or one time upgrade fee in order to enjoy the full features of the service with all trial restrictions lifted.

April 18, 2010 at 8:53 am Leave a comment

Tips for Using Quark Correctly in Commercial Printing

If you’re new to the wonders of Quark for desktop publishing and commercial printing, or even if you’re an advanced user, avoiding some of these common Quark mistakes will make your working experience smoother and less stressful.

One of the most common mistakes new users of Quark is to fail to register their software. Though tossing the registration card in the trashcan along with the plastic wrap packaging of any new software is habit for many people, you should think twice in this case. Registering with Quark has several distinct advantages. For one, registering with quark puts you into Quark’s user database. This automatically entitles you to 90 days of free after-purchase technical support, which can be invaluable should any unexpected platform or hardware problems slow your digital presses to a crawl.

Another common error involves the overuse of fonts on a single project. Tempting though it may be to run wild through the list from arial to zapf chancery, keep in mind that professional publishers rarely if ever employ more than two separate fonts on a single page. With a little practice and some time and effort, you can achieve a striking level of design and eye-appeal with correct image and text placement, color schemes and layout. In fact, the same basic idea of less is more applies to the total amount of content you put on one page.

Overcrowded pages full of different clashing colors, jammed-in images and pictures, and rocketing text bars looks overzealous at best and downright clownish at worst. Some subtlety and room for the eye to move will ultimately be appreciated by your audience. Pages with too much going on, and those blanketed in contrasting swaths of neon and animated graphics will quite literally become eyesores that are unlikely to generate repeat traffic.

Consider, instead, some of your favorite websites, especially ones you visit repeatedly. Chances are they have sleek, simple and elegant templates or navigational bars. Their color scheme is uniform and somewhat understated but still unique and appealing. You know exactly where you are once the page loads and it’s easy and comfortable for your eyes to scan the page and read long blocks of text.

Take a lesson from such sites and apply their general simplicity to your commercial printing project. Especially in environments where several postings or publications are competing for public attention, it’s the tastefully designed but visually pleasant publications that are likely to get the most consideration.
A final word to the wise Quark user involves master pages. These are like templates for your commercial printing project, and they define and keep track of those elements of your publication that are going to be unchanged from page to page.

Logos, headers, business address footers, for example, are all in the realm of master pages. Creating and using master pages will halve your production time while simultaneously ensuring the continuity and uniformity of your product. They quite easily reduce the possibility for error and omission, and therefore should not be overlooked.

April 17, 2010 at 8:58 am Leave a comment

Customers EXPECT Trust and Value in 2010

Has your customer base decreased during the decline of our nation’s economy? Probably so. Personal consumption, which drives economic activity, continues to fluctuate, which makes it even more imperative for businesses to earn customer trust and keep it.

Consumers are not parting with their money as easily as pre-recession days. They are looking for discounts, bundles, special savings packages, and rebates, in products and services – and also searching out better business relationships with those they feel will best put their hard-earned money to work. Customers are expecting competing companies to offer phenomenal value while earning and keeping their trust.

From a business perspective, we understand that the ROI of keeping current customers is far more desirable than acquiring new. On average, it costs a company at least five times as much to win a new customer versus keeping an existing one.

In fact, highly effective organizations reportedly spend an average of 10 percent of their operating budgets on resolving customer problems caused by poor service while ineffective organizations spend as much as 40 percent. Unhappy consumers don’t typically keep it to themselves either: dissatisfied customers generally tell twice as many people about a bad experience as they do a good experience.

With numbers like these as incentive, why don’t more businesses achieve their loyalty goals? Does your company even have clearly defined loyalty goals? Perhaps one reason for falling short on the success meter is due to the lack of control in delivering consistent behaviors that regularly please customers.To deliver that type of service companies must first understand what their perceived customers truly value and then plan for consistent implementation.

Consumers have lived through an onslaught of negative events over the past several years and continue to live in an unpredictable economy at best. The Commerce Department said The United States plunged into recession in December 2007 amid financial turmoil following a home mortgage meltdown. The economy shrank at a 5.7 percent pace in the first quarter of 2009, the government said last week in a revised estimate that showed slower consumer spending. The initial estimate was a decline of 6.1 percent.

As one of the scrambling businesses vying for the loyalty of “the cautious consumer”, trust must be created and maintained. It’s no secret that companies are collapsing around us daily. Making loyal customers happy has always been important, but more so now than ever, customers share their reviews of your service and/or product at the speed of the internet, making the art of relationship building of paramount importance.

The obvious conclusion? Give your customers what they want. At each interaction the customer is shaping an opinion of you and your business.

Be more than an email message that gets trapped in the junk folder.

Send a hand written thank you note, ensure quality products, choose vendors that meet your same customer service standards, reward employees who walk-the-walk and…

Track the good, the bad and the ugly…

Your customer service reputation is at stake and there are no second chances in this unpredictable economy of 2010.

April 16, 2010 at 2:24 pm Leave a comment

Common Errors Web to Print Designers Make

Whether you’re a graphic designer working on web to print projects or a small firm specializing in commercial printing products, be sure to avoid these common errors in laying out and finalizing your content. Overcrowding content spaces and creating eyesores, overusing too many different types of fonts or templates, and saving your project in a color format incompatible with most printers are all common flubs that can make your work less effective and more time-consuming.

A good rule of thumb for general graphic design as it relates to web to print applications is that less is more. When designing your first few projects, it’s easy to let your enthusiasm carry you away. But getting too heavy handed with sharp, contrasting colors, overly complicated graphics, and crowded content can actually be quite counter intuitive. Considering the visual comfort of your audience is a courtesy they will repay by giving your product more attention.

There should be enough space between major images, graphics, blocks of background color, and text to allow the eye to wander comfortable between them. Too much content jammed into one space is not only confusing but it will ultimately detract from your goal of communicating as much information as possible as visually pleasantly as possible. Web to print projects are almost always rich in visual content as well as text, but remember that graphics, images or pictures should enhance your overall message, not drown it out.

Along the same lines, resist the temptation to use every type of font in one page. Overusing font types gives an overall appearance of disorganization. Using one font type for headers or titles and another comfortable, easy to read font for all the body text is usually advisable. Using only two or three font types at max gives an impression of careful forethought and uniformity which are hallmarks of professional design.

One of the biggest headaches facing designers of web to print content is the RGB and CMYK distinction. Remember that RGB, which stands for red, green, blue is a coloration mode that is typically used for displaying colors on a computer screen or other graphical monitor. RGB mode achieves its various display colors by blending its three basic shades, and then adding these shades against the black background of the display screen to produce the final target hue.

Unfortunately, even though this mode of coloration is extremely prevalent on the soft-copy side of design, it doesn’t quite translate to hard copy printing without some careful coaxing. This is because most printers employ the CMYK mode of coloration, which stands for cyan, magenta, yellow and black. The CMYK mode is far more effective for printing because it features a dedicated black ink component for printing onto paper, which the RGB mode lacks.

However, because these modes are so different in terms of their makeup, the specific numerical color values they use to describe common colors we use everyday also differ. For this reason, make sure you convert your files from RGB to CMYK before you attempt to start finalizing and printing. Otherwise you’ll end up with a finished product that could look drastically different from what you designed on-screen.

April 15, 2010 at 9:46 am Leave a comment

Marketing Your Corporate Personality

What do Nike, Apple, Geico, Google, JACK and other such business giants have in common? BIG PERSONALITY! Ever stop to think that brand identity isn’t everything – especially in today’s virtual world where buzz, tweets, blogs, FaceBook and texts often speak more about your company than paid advertising?

These marketing greats demonstrate a personal mission tied to their professional message – which gives them unlimited confidence to shout their business from the rooftops. Through a very specific and consistently strong personality, they generate great flexibility in how they connect their message to relevant news and current events almost daily.

According to David Arvin, Visibility Coach,

“Developing and marketing a dynamic business personality is more than simply espousing and promoting a business philosophy or organizational message. These highly differentiated and unique companies are consistently walking-the-walk as well as talking the talk! They live the message in everything they do – and everything they don’t do.’

With BIG personalities always on display, these colorful companies crusade for their niche market: be it innovation, customer service, entertainment, luxury, fitness, or quality. Expression of their mission is paramount to a “simple” marketing approach or concrete strategy.

Take for instance, Nike and it’s recent show of support to Tiger Woods. Tiger has been, and IS still the representation of Nike’s personality. Tiger lost other endorsements, but not those that bank solely on his face as their image. As reported on CNN,

“Nike typically doesn’t shy away from mentioning athletes’ troubles in its ads, experts say. The company has stuck by other athletes with personal problems, such as basketball star Charles Barkley, who famously said in one ad he shouldn’t be a role model.”

By sticking close by the sides of its media personalities, Nike conveys its business personality: strong, constant – maybe even edgy. You decide:

Nike aired a TV commercial on April 7, 2010, featuring Tiger and the voice of his late father, Earl Woods, an edgy move that calls out his personal problems on the eve of his return to competitive golf. The ad aired on ESPN and the Golf Channel just one day before the start of the Masters.

If you buy into this personality quotient, but don’t currently have it, how do you get it? Is it possible to create such an “intangible” without flopping? Let’s face it, this is risky business and takes careful top-down consideration.

  1. Look at your company mission statement. Does it give you plenty of adjectives to work with? Does it give you room to be bold and a little self-important? Does it give you permission to be top dog in your industry?
  2. How about your overall marketing strategy? Print ads, TV, radio, brochures, business cards, etc. What do these print pieces convey about your company’s personality, or lack of? Have you asked any outsiders lately? You might be surprised.
  3. Decide as a team whether this is a path worth taking and if so, don’t look back! Commitment is critical here. Learn from Nike and be ready to persevere.

If you’re not interested in the spotlight or not quite ready for such heavy media attention, get there. If you’re there and ready – then jump in. Be educated, be ready for the good and the bad, bring the passion and deliver an engaging business personality that the masses will remember!

April 14, 2010 at 4:31 pm Leave a comment

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