Posts filed under ‘indesign’

The Basics of InDesign’s Control Palette for Commercial Printing

Commercial printing publishers, graphic designers and casual users alike have reason to celebrate Adobe’s InDesign software for its customizability and robustness of functionality. Knowing how it differs from other commonly used web to print publishing software is essential to getting the full use out of this software. Because the basic features of this software are easy to overlook but always applicable throughout the course of a design project, a quick refresher is in order for anyone hoping to get the most out of their InDesign experience.

The customizable menu bar, which defaults to being docked at the top of your workspace in InDesign, features a special palette known as the control palette. This is the palette which changes in appearance and functionality to reflect any new tool selection made by the user. This control palette also contains the item measurements of any object you create or select within the workspace. For example, if you were to create a rectangular shape in the center of the workspace and then select it, you would notice the X and Y coordinates of this new object being displayed in the control palette.

These coordinates are very helpful when it comes to properly aligning various elements within your project or positioning single elements precisely. Because web to print and commercial printing applications, for example, demand a high level of precision in order to guarantee proper image displays on hard copies, it’s important to make note of these coordinates.

When you select your rectangle, you will notice a display of various little black boxes. When the center box is selected, you are telling InDesign to use the corresponding center of the rectangle as the reference point. Based off this reference point, the software will display the applicable coordinates. If you were to click a different reference point box, such as one in a corner, InDesign will likewise show you the applicable coordinates based off your new selection.

Other key elements of the control palette include the H and W values. These offer the user at-a-glance measurements of the height and width of their selected object. Another handy tool provided for managing the size and shape of your object is represented in the small chain icon nearby. Clicking this chain icon tells the program to constrain the selected object’s height and width in order to preserve a constant scale.

Basically, if you increase the height of a constrained object, its width will increase proportionally, and vice versa. This is a great time saving tool whenever you’re trying to create a banner or graphic for, say, a print on demand product that requires a totally filled space. In the same vein, should you find yourself having trouble manually expanding an object or image to take up the exact amount of space required, you can directly type over the displayed H and W values in order to tailor your object to your exact specifications. In this case, the chain feature serves the same purpose and will behave just as it would in a manual expansion.

April 16, 2010 at 8:42 am Leave a comment

The Basics of Adobe’s InDesign Tool Palette for Web to Print Products

As any long term user of Adobe’s InDesign will tell you, the tool palette gets a lot of use. It’s important to understand its basic functions in order to get the most out of your design project. If you’re just beginning to learn your way around this design software, it can be helpful to know that hovering your mouse over each tool for a moment will produce a pop-up with the name of the tool. A good portion of becoming comfortable with this software and using it to successfully design print on demand or web to print products is simply learning the full language of the functions, so hovering over any icon you aren’t yet familiar with will soon have you up to speed.

The tool palette in Adobe’s InDesign has a feature common to many other palettes across various other platforms and software suites. Known as the flyout, this little arrow at the bottom corner of many of the icons in the tools palette will display hidden or additional specialized options for each function when clicked.

The next major feature of the tools palette, known as swatches, is located a bit further down. These swatches allow for the assignment of color throughout your project. The swatches section of the tool palette displays both the fill color, the color taking up the body of an object or space, as well as the stroke color, which is the color of any outlines. You will also notice an arrow that allows you to swap which of these colors two you’re focusing on with a single click.

If you’ve been tinkering with slightly different shades and hues only to feel ultimately unsatisfied with your color choices, you can revert an area or object back to default coloration by pressing the small default color button on the swatch section of the tool palette. If you haven’t selected any text, you can also press “D” in order to do the same.

The next functions are essential to print on demand and web to print applications. Beneath the swatches section of the tool palette you will notice two icons, one of which is a box. This box icon tells the InDesign software to apply the currently selected colors to boxes or objects. The other icon, the capital letter T, conversely tells the software to apply selected colors to text only. This is a useful tool whenever you have occasion to create boxes or objects with text inside them, as you can quickly choose whether a certain color will be applied to the box, the text, or both simultaneously.

Beneath these color applicator icons are three more icons which respectively apply single colors, gradients of color, or no color whatsoever to a selected object. For example, selecting a box you have already colored green, and then clicking the no-color icon, will remove the green color from the selected box. Becoming proficient with these quick shortcuts to handling color will drastically increase your overall design speed.

April 14, 2010 at 8:22 am Leave a comment

Adobe’s InDesign Basics for Commercial Printing

If you’re interested in learning Adobe’s InDesign publishing software for web to print, print on demand or other commercial printing applications, setting a foundation in the basics of the software will pay off down the road. Knowing where the proper tools and functions for the job are located will ultimately save you time and energy over the course of a long design project.

First and foremost, the InDesign menu bar is located at the top of the screen. Also notice the palettes section, which will show up as little windows each with their own special area of control. One handles paragraphs, for instance, while another is in charge of colors. Another essential element of this menu bar region is the control bar. The control bar will change its layout and functionality based on whichever tool you are currently using. Note that this control bar, along with many of the basic elements of InDesign, is programmed according to default settings, which you can change at any time to better suit your working style and your typical usage. The layout you choose for print on demand projects will likely differ from the layout chosen by someone working in commercial printing.

One of the nice features of InDesign is that the menu bar will provide you with access to all of the software’s functions. This way of organizing abilities, modes and functions is helpful in the beginning, especially when you’re still learning your way around the software and trying to get a feel for where various options are located. However, note that power users eventually come to learn the various shortcuts for their desired and most used functions, in order to save themselves even more time and streamline their design process. To this end, you should take note of the shortcuts for various functions as you find functions for the first time. Before you know it, you’ll be zipping along in your design space using keyboard hotkeys without having to pause to find functions from the drop down menu bars.

In fact, if you happen to be a QuarkXPress user and find yourself trying to relearn a new set of hotkeys, you are in luck. InDesign has functionality built in with just this problem in mind. In order to revert InDesign’s hotkeys, simply go up to the edit menu, choose “Keyboard shortcuts”, and underneath “Set” choose “Shortcuts for QuarkXPress.”

Remember that the menu bar itself is docked at the top of the screen only by default. This means you can easily drag it to a preferred position, or even dock it at the bottom of the screen instead. Depending on the web to print or picture images you are using, you might find it more convenient to have the bar close at hand to the workspace itself, or far out of your way so as to better be able to see your entire image. Spending some time customizing your workspace before you start designing full time will go a long way in improving your overall experience.

April 12, 2010 at 11:37 am Leave a comment

Getting Cooler Color with InDesign CS4’s Kuler Panel

Learn how to use InDesign CS4’s new Kuler panel to create perfect colors for any project.

Use InDesign and Kuler for perfect color combination’s

February 22, 2010 at 5:14 pm Leave a comment

Prisma Graphic Services and Capabilities

Prisma Press Floor

 

 

 

 

Prisma Graphic has the following services and capabilities.

Equipment List

Electronic Prepress

  • (1) Magnus 800 Platesetter with 5 Autoloader/Cassettes
  • (1) Creo Trendsetter Spectrum Platesetter
  • (9) Mac Work Stations
  • (9) PC Work Stations
  • (6) PREPS Imposition Stations
  • (2) Prinergy JVX 10.4 Ripping & Trapping Systems
  • Prinergy Stochastic Screener
  • Prinergy – PDF Workflow
  • Kodak – FM Staccato Screening
  • Canon Color ImpoProofer Automated
  • 2-sided proofer with Color Management
  • Canon ImagePrograf Contract Color Proofer with Kodak Color Management
  • Epson Inkjet Color 9900 Proofer 44”
  •  (2) Sherpa 2-Sided Proofers
  • HP DesignJet 5500 Proofer
  • Pictoral Proofer (11” x 17” max)
  • Multiple CD/DVD Burners
  • Rimage Premium CD/DVD PlexWriter (6 Unit) High-Speed
  • Eversmart Pro2 Flatbed Scanner (11.5” x 17” original input)
  • X RITE PlateScope (Plate Quality/Process Control)
  • X RITE Spectrodensitometer (Proofing, Plating, Press Profiling Process Control)
  • Eye One Color Calibration System
  • Profile Maker Pro (Color Profiling system)
  • Complete Up to date Software and Font Library
  • All files archived on DAT and DVD
  • Mirrored 3T Raid Dell Servers & Gigabit Speed Network
  • E. Quix & High Speed Network Server
  • FTP Server
  • (2) CIP3 Servers
  • Kodak ColorTune Proofing Server
  • Prinergy 1.6 Remote Proofing Server
  • Kodak InSite – Customer Job Interface 

Bindery

  • (2) Heidelberg Cylinder Press; Sheet Size: 22 x 30”
  • Brausse – 22 1/2 x 29” Die Cut, Emboss and Foil Stamp
  • Kluge EHD – 14 x 20” Die Cut, Emboss and Foil Stamp
  • Baum Lawson MPU, 47” Paper Cutter (Micro-cut)
  • Polar 52” EMC Paper Cutter (Micro-cut)
  • (2) Saber® 54” Cutter w/ Baumann Jogger
  • Mueller Martini Saddle Stitcher   10 Stations w/ Cover Feeder & 3-Knife Trimmer
  • (2) Mueller Martini Saddle Stitcher   6 Stations /Cover Feeder w/ 3-Knife Trimmer
  • Perfect Binder 18”
  • Rollem TR, 35” Perforating & Scoring
  • Rollem TR, 40” Perforating & Scoring
  • MBO B26S Perfection Folder 26 x 40”; 32-Page
  • MBO B23 Folder 20 x 26”; 8-Page
  • MBO B32 S Perfection Folder 32 x 40”; 8-Page
  • Stahl Folder 30 x 40” 16-Page Folder
  • Kluge Pocket Folder Gluer w/Final Fold Ability
  • Challenge Paper Drill, 5-Hole
  • (1) Auto Shrink Wrap Packager
  • (3) Semi-Auto Shrink Wrap Packager

Presses (Web, Sheetfed & Digital)

  • M-130 Heidelberg 38 inch, 5 Color Heatset Web with Color Control System CCS Loop
  • Combo Folder – Sheeter – Pattern Perforator    Maximum Sheet:  22.75 x 38 inches, Maximum Image Area:  22.5 x 37.5 inches
  • Color King 36 inch, 2 Color Web Press / Combo Folder  Maximum Sheet:  22.75 x 36 inches, Maximum Image Area:  22.5 x 35.5 inches
  • Akiyama 40 inch, 5 Color Perfector with Color Control System CCS Loop Maximum Sheet:  28 x 40 inches,  Maximum Image Area: 27.5 x 39.5 inches
  •  (2) Akiyama 40 inch, 6 Color w/ Aqueous Coater,  Maximum Sheet:  28 x 40 inches,   Maximum Image Area:  27.5.  X 39.5 inches
  • Mitsubishi 28 inch, 6 Color w/ Aqueous Coater,    Maximum Sheet:  20 x 28 inches,    Maximum Image Area:  19.5 x 27.5 inches
  • Ryobi True 2 Color (Best for Registration and Solids),  Maximum Sheet:  12 x 18 inches,  Maximum Image Area: 11.5 x 17.5 inches
  • (2) AB Dick 2 Color Replicator,  Maximum Sheet:  12 x 18 inches,  Maximum Image Area: 11.5 x 17.5 inches
  • Halm Jet 2C Color Perfector Envelope Press,    Maximum Sheet:  13 x 18 inches, Maximum Image Area: 11 x 17 inches
  • HP Indigo 5000 4 Color Press   Maximum Sheet:  12 x 18 inches,  Maximum Image Area: 11.6 x 17.2 inches
  • C6500 Digital 4 Color Copier/Press,   Maximum Sheet:  12 x 18 inches,  Maximum Image Area: 11.6 x 17.2 inches

Fulfillment

  • Pick and Pack
  • Package and Distribution
  • On-line Customized Inventory Management
  • Cycle Count

 Mailing Services

Our Mailing Department offers a fully integrated service, which
is completely in-house, and configured to suit any requirements.
These services include data acquisition and management, CASS
certification, NCOA service, DPV validation. Prisma can customize
any mailing program to satisfy the needs of our clients.

 Dokshop.com (Web-to-Print Solution)

A unique business-to-business product that enables users to order,
personalize, proof and manage print materials online.  Its parameter-
based programming allows customization with various user options
and controls. Each site can be specifically tailored to fulfill any client’s
needs.

____________________________________________________

 Offset Printing Services:

  •  Sheetfed: Medium Quantity Print Runs
  •  Jprint 5C Perfector Press with Color Control System CCL
  • Sheetfed: Large Quantity Print Runs with our new Control System CCL
  •  Heatset Web: Large Quantity Print runs with Color
  • Open Web: Short and Large Print runs

  Digital Printing:

  •  Including Variable Data
  •  Indigo Short Quantity Print runs, Up to 12”x18”, Including Variable Data with Inline Finishing
  •  Konica Minolta Quantity Print runs, Up to 12”x18″
  •  41”X72” Large Format-Short Quantity Print runs
Prepress  
  •  State-of-the-Art Computer Hardware,
  •  Software & Color Correction & Image Manipulation
  •  Hi-res Canon Kodak Proofs
  •  HP Ink Jet & Laser Proofs, Sherpa Digital Proofs
  •  Prinergy Ripping & Trapping
  •  Prinergy –FM Segundo Stochastic Screening
  •  Kodak Remote Proofing
  •  Kodak-FM Staccato Screening
  •  Prinergy PDF Workflow
  • SSL Secured FTP Site
  • Direct-to-Plate Magnus 800

  Design & Production 

  •  Outside agency support
  •  Supplement In-house Creative Staff
  • Develop Original Concepts 
  • Follow Existing Corporate Graphic Standards

 CD/DVD Duplicating

  •  Data Duplication 
  • Thermal Label Printing

Bindery

  • Folding 
  • Scoring 
  • Perforating 
  • Stitching 
  • Perfect Bind 
  • Die Cutting 
  • Embossing 
  • Foil Stamping 
  • Gluing
  • Drilling
  • Mounting
  • Sequential Numbering

  DOKSHOP: Online e-Commerce Website

  • Pre-approved Products
  •  Brand consistency
  • Static and Dynamic Fields
  • Instant Online PDF ApprovalView Order Status and History
  • Customizable Shipping

State-of-the-Art Warehouse Facility

  • Product Inventory Storage
  • Clearly Labeled Product with Scannable Bar Codes

 Fulfillment  

  • Computerized Pick & Pac
  • Build Kits of Various Configurations Requirements
  • Bulk or Custom Packaging to Fit your Unique
  • Ship to Single or Multiple Locations

Mailing, Shipping & Receiving

  • CASS Certified Mailing Services
  • Database Management
  • Inserting
  • 1st Class, Standard Presort
  • Bulk Mail with FedEx Overnight
  • 2-day or Ground Shipping
  • Common Carrier

 

Contact Prisma Graphic for a quote on all your printing, design and mailing needs.

 

November 12, 2009 at 5:57 pm Leave a comment

Why printing? The ways Prisma Graphic can help your company prosper.

Why printing?  The ways printing helps your company prosper.

 Prisma Graphic  At one time or another we all have taken printing for granted. Perhaps because print has been the world’s number one communication medium for so long, we tend to overlook its impact and power. That oversight could be detrimental to the success of a marketing campaign, a product launch or a branding initiative trying to make connections. Consumers trust print, feel comfortable using it and are unable to fast forward past it. Electronic content comes and goes and when it’s gone, your message disappears with it. Print, on the other hand, is there for the long run.

 According to a recent survey by the Magazine Publishers of America 24% of readers will pass along an interesting article to someone else, 23% will save it for future reference and 13% will visit a relevant website; giving advertisers double and triple bonuses on their marketing investments.

This magazine is dedicated to the persuasive power of print and how it continues to evolve and play an important role in the marketing mix. Along with several informative articles throughout, we have included the advantages of using print. We hope you find this blog informative, inspiring and ultimately beneficial to your marketing efforts.

 Sincerely,

The Prisma Graphic Team

November 11, 2009 at 10:38 pm Leave a comment

Primsa Graphic is Proof to Print G7 Master Qualified.

Proof to Print G7 Master Qualified

Prisma Graphic is Proof to Print- G7 Master Qualified by IDEAlliance.  For more information about Prisma Graphic and the G7 Master rating please contact us at Prisma Graphic.

November 11, 2009 at 10:01 pm Leave a comment

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