Posts filed under ‘printer in Phoenix’

Prisma Graphic utilizes Web to Print Technology

According to Wikipedia: Web-to-print, also known as Web2Print or remote publishing, is a commercial prepress process that bridges the gap between digital content online and commercial print production. This process allows a print house, a client, and possibly a graphic designer to create, edit, and approve computer-based online templates during the prepress phase. Web to print is a technology to help business owners create a consistent brand image and build loyalty with their clients.

Prisma Graphic as a Web to Print Company

Prisma Graphic is not just a web to print company; with our exclusive Dokshop; but a print empowering company. Dokshop gives business owners control over their image through their print materials and collateral marketing efforts.

By utilizing Dokshop, companies can have their own business printing portal with access from anywhere.

The Dokshop services lets you sign in and create your custom portal with your images and marketing materials. Marketing Directors, managers, or employees can access company approved marketing materials with just a click of the mouse. Choose your template and add your text and we will print it for you and have it delivered to your location. We make web to print easy.

Let us show you how easy it is to set up your custom portal with an online web-to-print demonstration today.

June 15, 2010 at 1:50 pm Leave a comment

Web to Print Marketing Material From Customized Portals: Anytime, Anywhere, ACCURATELY

Powerful web-to-print marketing solutions are revolutionizing marketing efficiency and accountability. Around-the-clock access to pre-approved corporate collateral enables customers, franchisees and sales teams to have immediate access to the tools they need to create successful marketing campaigns quickly, easily and accurately.

DokShop is one such marketing collateral management solution that offers online proofing technology that reduces production time. With DokShop your company can have their own online catalog of customizable printed materials ready to order. Each site can be branded for individual clients.

1. Coordinate worldwide marketing efforts
2. View and download PDF proofs
3. Access powerful, dynamic reports and receive email updates
4. Assign administrators to monitor and approve orders
5. Define and analyze cost centers

According to Prisma Graphic owner, Bob Anderson, gone are the days that it takes seven touch points to get a business card printed…”For a general job like ordering a business card, first you tell your secretary, they ask the marketing department, it has to be called in and then a sales person takes an order. It gets typeset, proofed, and then goes to print,” The heartburn and headache that used to keep marketing gatekeepers awake at night is completely alleviated through this technology.

Working smarter through the use of templates and web-to-print portals, allows organizations to cut down on unnecessary print overages, inaccuracies, brand band-aids, and design paralysis. Consider how much collateral your company prints. Chances are, you have ongoing needs for stationery, forms, marketing materials, and much more.

Anderson said the technology enables projects to move four times as fast through the system. It also tracks projects, similarly to the way a package to be delivered by UPS can be tracked on the Internet.

Whether your company is large or small, modifying and managing those materials can be a time-consuming and expensive process. Simplify corporate processes by utilizing DokShop.

At Make-A-Wish, a non-profit that grants the wishes of kids with life-threatening illnesses, director of brand communications, Mike Pressendo uses DokShop.com to help mange the communication output of 72 chapters. “I want to maintain continuity of the brand across all our markets. This technology allows me to do that and then allows the chapters to localize it. But I don’t want them monkeying with fonts and headlines. With this, I can keep the overall look and feel the same across the board.”

Pressendo said the technology creates a huge financial savings, allows for better quality control and saves time. “This allows us to preserve and promote our brand, “ he said. “We’ve had other printers, but they couldn’t keep up with our technological requirements.”

This online service is a streamlined, cost-effective way to order and print all your business materials. Since 2001, businesses around the country have used DokShop to improve turn-around time, reduce human error, and ensure brand continuity. DokShop is fully customizable and enables both internal employees and distribution networks to order personalized collateral.

Corporate brands remain protected, yet promoted according to universal guidelines within local markets, increasing the relevance of the message to the target market and improving marketing performance.

Marketing accuracy has never been more qualified. Log onto DokShop.com today for a demo – and a better night’s rest!

June 9, 2010 at 7:03 pm Leave a comment

Prisma Graphics: Top Marketing Supply Chain Provider

Recently, American Executive did an article showcasing us, Prisma Graphic, a local Phoenix commercial printer. The article interviewed Bob Anderson, owner of Prisma Graphics since 2001, regarding how the company has been able to stay in the top 10% of commercial printers nationally.

There have been two key things that can be attributed to Prisma Graphic’s success in the printing industry. The first was its people. Anderson said the 28 employees working for the company in 2000 were well known for their high-quality standards. Today, 22 of those employees are still with the company, and although Prisma now employs 130 people, that dedication to quality still remains. For example, the majority of Dokshop’s business has come through referrals, Anderson said.

Second, the team suggested working with the client’s marketing department online rather than by phone and fax. Back then, there were no available software programs allowing for that kind of collaboration, so the company’s internal developers created a program of their own, and Dokshop was born.

Dokshop has enabled large corporate clients to have the brand protected by using Prisma Graphic for their collateral marketing material. The company even handles warehousing, fulfillment, and inventory management for clients, tracking and delivering orders as needed. And, as companies continue to reduce marketing budgets and head counts, Anderson predicts the demand for these services will grow.

Read the entire article to find out how Prisma has succeeded and continued to grow in the down economy and how they are using innovative web to print products such as Dokshop and their new designer product, PrintPower, to stay on top.

American Executive article: Prisma Graphic: Open to Opportunities

June 7, 2010 at 2:19 pm Leave a comment

How to Drastically Improve Your Designs with the 5 C’s

Design is everywhere. This is the topic on conversation for a new article at design informer. Since design is everywhere it is the job of the design to present that design in the best possible light. By sticking to the 5 “C”‘s of design, Jad take you on a great tutorial to help make designers better designers by sticking to some basics that most not be overlooked or forgotten.

Read the full article over at designinformer and learn how to improve your design skills.

May 20, 2010 at 3:46 pm Leave a comment

Problems To Avoid When Color Printing

By: Kaitlyn Miller

Problems do occur when you’re color printing; and the effect is always on the total cost you are going to pay once your marketing materials such as your poster printing is delivered to you. But most of the problems can be avoided even before you have your print posters for example reproduced by your color printer. One way to do it is to communicate well with your color printer your specifications.

Indeed, many problems arise from poor communication between you and your color printer. The way you explain and describe your job order and how much the color printer quoted it is always the culprit. Many of the problems are actually avoidable if only you and your color printer are on the same wavelength. What I mean by this is that no problem would arise if both of you are speaking the same language.

You have to understand that you and your color printer actually speak different. What you want done is not the same as how they are going to do it. Unless both of you understand each other fully, you will never get the results you desire from the price you are willing to pay.

One of the most common mistakes is to take for granted the meaning of one (1) sheet of paper. One sheet is not equal to one page in printing talk. Printers do not run individual sheets of paper. Rather they run it numbers divisible by 4. So if you need a booklet for example, you have to ask for a quote on either 52 or 56 pages because it would be easier for them to divide it into 4. The correct way of asking for a quote on a booklet is to ask for a 28-page saddle stitched material. This would mean 56 pages of booklet stapled (saddle-stitched) in the middle.

Another mistake is in the description of the size of the material. Let’s take the booklet as an example again. The standard sizes are 5.5 by 8.5 and 8.5 by 11. More or less than that and the printer would have a hard time giving you an exact quote. And don’t forget to remember that the size of your print order would be the one AFTER you trimmed it.

Next mistake is to describe the paper or stock used. You have to realize that the quote would depend on the type of paper stock you are going to use, as well as the frequency you are going to use it. If it’s the booklet again, you would probably have a different stock of the cover from that of the inside pages. For a poster printing order, it’s easier because you will have one paper stock throughout your project. But you still have to specify because the kind of stock you’re going to use would reflect the type of image you would want to have as a business.

One other big mistake is to submit the wrong file. Printers do have a specific file they require to get you the exact material for your results. The wrong file will definitely cost you more time, effort and money. You wouldn’t want to have your printer print your file again because it would cost you double. And you would also not want to pay for something that you’re not satisfied with.

Mistakes when color printing can actually be avoided if you communicate well with your printer what you want. The more your printer knows your requirements, the bigger the chances that you’ll get the results you desire.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Problems To Avoid When Color Printing

May 13, 2010 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

Timing is Everything

Never before has timing been as important in launching a marketing campaign and maintaining customer communications as the here and NOW. With today’s flood of communications and endless messages, maybe what is said matters less than WHEN it’s said.

Consider the significance of this for a moment. Much of the focus as writers, promoters and marketers tends to be on the messaging, but how much attention is currently paid to things like time of day when messages are sent – and more importantly, when they are received?

As real time communication tools like Twitter and status updates on Facebook and LinkedIn and mobile messaging take top priority in fully integrated communication campaigns, the question of WHEN is obviously going to continue becoming more and more significant.

With these real time platforms, readers rarely give a second glance – most blasts, updates or texts are skimmed right away or junked. Given this, you want your message to hit when your audience is the most receptive – including the right day and the right time.

Is it possible to determine this information or is it too dynamic? It depends. Studies exist with benchmarks for best days of the week produce the best open or click rates. These are aggregate numbers across thousands of senders, however, so be leery of the data, because data alone doesn’t take into account your particular call to action, target audience, or recipient behavior.

So…maybe what’s best is conducting your own study. Start with your best guesses based on what you know of your audience, emails and organization and then test to find best days and time combinations from there. Don’t forget to weigh those options against your call to action.

For instance, if your call to action is related to a purchase, obviously you want to consider your audience’s pay periods. If your call is time sensitive, then calendaring is imperative.

Keeping detailed records is what’s going to make or break this methodology. You must have a good system for tracking your end results and then USE the data for future decision-making.

Remember, real-time communications is intended to help messaging be more relevant to your customer. If you’re able to graph and predict more successful times for sending out various pieces of your campaign, obviously you’ll be more successful and ahead of the competition.

Image: stefanomaggi

May 3, 2010 at 9:59 am Leave a comment

How we React to Color – Tips for Commercial Printing

Even in the wilds of nature, color plays an intensive role in behavior, attraction and aversion. Color is informative. It tells a creature whether or not something is probably safe to eat, as well as whether or not another creature is weakened, sickly or healthy. Color has the power to alter moods. Softer oceanic colors can soothe frazzled nerves, high energy neon colors dazzle and delight the night life crowds, and power colors adorn the workspaces of professionals that understand the profound effect their surroundings can have on their productivity and focus. With so much to be communicated via proper coloration, and with certain tasks being better suited to certain colors, any professional working in commercial printing would do well to put extensive thought into the subtle or explosive messages they are sending with the palette they select for each project.

Successful commercial printing first requires a clear and goal-oriented identification of the overall mood or schema of the project at hand. Publishing with the intent to advertize will usually require a far different set of shades than that required by publishing with the intent to inform. Taking a moment beforehand to clearly define the project goals and intentions will pay dividends down the road in terms of successful and relevant visual themes.

Once the goals are defined, it’s time to choose the best colors for the particular job. Advertizing material, which is always designed to be eye-catching and visually distinct from information surrounding it, benefits greatly from oppositional colors that create strong contrast to the human eye, and thereby increased reactive interest. Notice how often advertizing materials feature dichromatic balloons, banners, or bubbles in yellow and red.

Because these two colors are naturally strong signals for the human brain, due to their wide prevalence in the wild as indicators of food edibility or the shock of blood, they cast a powerful spell all their own upon modern readers. At the same time, their placements on the light spectrum cause them to be mutually enhancing. Red and yellow trimmed informational boxes are even more noticeable than either solid red boxes or solid yellow boxes.

The overall effect achieved by these two colors when synthesized by the human brain is one of heightened attention. Countless other such combinations exist, each with their own varying thematic message. Deep greens, when commingled with dark or soft browns suggest earthy peacefulness, growth and the natural world.

Tinkering with these combinations and allowing time for various color themes to show their ultimate thematic effects can greatly enhance any commercial printing project. Likewise, identifying the target audience of any particular publication and making educated guesses as to their thematic expectations or moods will increase the overall effectiveness of assembled content. Brochures designed to woo potential retirees to a beach community, for example, should display the area being promoted in soft, relaxing, pleasant hues. A mixture between the tranquil blue comfort of sea and sky and the entrancing sherbet swirls of a sunset will strongly deliver the message that it’s time to buy tickets.

April 25, 2010 at 8:32 am Leave a comment

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