Problems To Avoid When Color Printing

By: Kaitlyn Miller

Problems do occur when you’re color printing; and the effect is always on the total cost you are going to pay once your marketing materials such as your poster printing is delivered to you. But most of the problems can be avoided even before you have your print posters for example reproduced by your color printer. One way to do it is to communicate well with your color printer your specifications.

Indeed, many problems arise from poor communication between you and your color printer. The way you explain and describe your job order and how much the color printer quoted it is always the culprit. Many of the problems are actually avoidable if only you and your color printer are on the same wavelength. What I mean by this is that no problem would arise if both of you are speaking the same language.

You have to understand that you and your color printer actually speak different. What you want done is not the same as how they are going to do it. Unless both of you understand each other fully, you will never get the results you desire from the price you are willing to pay.

One of the most common mistakes is to take for granted the meaning of one (1) sheet of paper. One sheet is not equal to one page in printing talk. Printers do not run individual sheets of paper. Rather they run it numbers divisible by 4. So if you need a booklet for example, you have to ask for a quote on either 52 or 56 pages because it would be easier for them to divide it into 4. The correct way of asking for a quote on a booklet is to ask for a 28-page saddle stitched material. This would mean 56 pages of booklet stapled (saddle-stitched) in the middle.

Another mistake is in the description of the size of the material. Let’s take the booklet as an example again. The standard sizes are 5.5 by 8.5 and 8.5 by 11. More or less than that and the printer would have a hard time giving you an exact quote. And don’t forget to remember that the size of your print order would be the one AFTER you trimmed it.

Next mistake is to describe the paper or stock used. You have to realize that the quote would depend on the type of paper stock you are going to use, as well as the frequency you are going to use it. If it’s the booklet again, you would probably have a different stock of the cover from that of the inside pages. For a poster printing order, it’s easier because you will have one paper stock throughout your project. But you still have to specify because the kind of stock you’re going to use would reflect the type of image you would want to have as a business.

One other big mistake is to submit the wrong file. Printers do have a specific file they require to get you the exact material for your results. The wrong file will definitely cost you more time, effort and money. You wouldn’t want to have your printer print your file again because it would cost you double. And you would also not want to pay for something that you’re not satisfied with.

Mistakes when color printing can actually be avoided if you communicate well with your printer what you want. The more your printer knows your requirements, the bigger the chances that you’ll get the results you desire.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/Problems To Avoid When Color Printing

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May 13, 2010 at 10:59 am Leave a comment

Something Worth Holding

As gizmos like the iPad and Kindle take technology to new levels of customer comfort, messaging through interactive touch is the new “little black dress.” Thankfully, for tactical –minded people, holding something, feeling its texture, sensing its smell, and evaluating its texture and quality is in fashion.

For those in the print world, this might seem to scream, “Quit taking our beloved paper goods away!” But alas, this is a golden opportunity to take advantage of the romance with touch. Get creative with your print materials. Have a little fun with some redesigns and actually give your customers something worth holding!

Let’s talk specifics. What about your business card design?

Designs are a journey, they connect people. They connect the consumer with the producer through a product or service.

According to fellow blogger Nick Barker,

“Design is all around us – the chair you are sitting on, the keyboard you are touching and the building you find yourself in. Design is at the heart of everything. I believe what makes a good design is a holistic creation right through a product or service. A design should effectively connect the consumer with the product or service.”

(more…)

May 10, 2010 at 12:11 pm Leave a comment

Timing is Everything

Never before has timing been as important in launching a marketing campaign and maintaining customer communications as the here and NOW. With today’s flood of communications and endless messages, maybe what is said matters less than WHEN it’s said.

Consider the significance of this for a moment. Much of the focus as writers, promoters and marketers tends to be on the messaging, but how much attention is currently paid to things like time of day when messages are sent – and more importantly, when they are received?

As real time communication tools like Twitter and status updates on Facebook and LinkedIn and mobile messaging take top priority in fully integrated communication campaigns, the question of WHEN is obviously going to continue becoming more and more significant.

With these real time platforms, readers rarely give a second glance – most blasts, updates or texts are skimmed right away or junked. Given this, you want your message to hit when your audience is the most receptive – including the right day and the right time.

Is it possible to determine this information or is it too dynamic? It depends. Studies exist with benchmarks for best days of the week produce the best open or click rates. These are aggregate numbers across thousands of senders, however, so be leery of the data, because data alone doesn’t take into account your particular call to action, target audience, or recipient behavior.

So…maybe what’s best is conducting your own study. Start with your best guesses based on what you know of your audience, emails and organization and then test to find best days and time combinations from there. Don’t forget to weigh those options against your call to action.

For instance, if your call to action is related to a purchase, obviously you want to consider your audience’s pay periods. If your call is time sensitive, then calendaring is imperative.

Keeping detailed records is what’s going to make or break this methodology. You must have a good system for tracking your end results and then USE the data for future decision-making.

Remember, real-time communications is intended to help messaging be more relevant to your customer. If you’re able to graph and predict more successful times for sending out various pieces of your campaign, obviously you’ll be more successful and ahead of the competition.

Image: stefanomaggi

May 3, 2010 at 9:59 am Leave a comment

How we React to Color – Tips for Commercial Printing

Even in the wilds of nature, color plays an intensive role in behavior, attraction and aversion. Color is informative. It tells a creature whether or not something is probably safe to eat, as well as whether or not another creature is weakened, sickly or healthy. Color has the power to alter moods. Softer oceanic colors can soothe frazzled nerves, high energy neon colors dazzle and delight the night life crowds, and power colors adorn the workspaces of professionals that understand the profound effect their surroundings can have on their productivity and focus. With so much to be communicated via proper coloration, and with certain tasks being better suited to certain colors, any professional working in commercial printing would do well to put extensive thought into the subtle or explosive messages they are sending with the palette they select for each project.

Successful commercial printing first requires a clear and goal-oriented identification of the overall mood or schema of the project at hand. Publishing with the intent to advertize will usually require a far different set of shades than that required by publishing with the intent to inform. Taking a moment beforehand to clearly define the project goals and intentions will pay dividends down the road in terms of successful and relevant visual themes.

Once the goals are defined, it’s time to choose the best colors for the particular job. Advertizing material, which is always designed to be eye-catching and visually distinct from information surrounding it, benefits greatly from oppositional colors that create strong contrast to the human eye, and thereby increased reactive interest. Notice how often advertizing materials feature dichromatic balloons, banners, or bubbles in yellow and red.

Because these two colors are naturally strong signals for the human brain, due to their wide prevalence in the wild as indicators of food edibility or the shock of blood, they cast a powerful spell all their own upon modern readers. At the same time, their placements on the light spectrum cause them to be mutually enhancing. Red and yellow trimmed informational boxes are even more noticeable than either solid red boxes or solid yellow boxes.

The overall effect achieved by these two colors when synthesized by the human brain is one of heightened attention. Countless other such combinations exist, each with their own varying thematic message. Deep greens, when commingled with dark or soft browns suggest earthy peacefulness, growth and the natural world.

Tinkering with these combinations and allowing time for various color themes to show their ultimate thematic effects can greatly enhance any commercial printing project. Likewise, identifying the target audience of any particular publication and making educated guesses as to their thematic expectations or moods will increase the overall effectiveness of assembled content. Brochures designed to woo potential retirees to a beach community, for example, should display the area being promoted in soft, relaxing, pleasant hues. A mixture between the tranquil blue comfort of sea and sky and the entrancing sherbet swirls of a sunset will strongly deliver the message that it’s time to buy tickets.

April 25, 2010 at 8:32 am Leave a comment

Are All Your “Marketing Eggs” in One Basket?

Email is part of our daily lives and definitely not a fad that is going away. Carefully managing mailboxes and email habits is on every CEO’s mind as billions of dollars are lost in productivity each year.

A typical information worker who sits at a computer all day turns to his e-mail program more than 50 times and uses instant messaging 77 times, according to one measure by RescueTime, a company that analyzes computer habits. The company, which draws its data from 40,000 people who have tracking software on their computers, found that on average the worker also stops at 40 Web sites over the course of the day.
According to a New York Times article, “The fractured attention comes at a cost. In the United States, more than $650 billion a year in productivity is lost because of unnecessary interruptions, predominately mundane matters,” according to Basex. The firm also reports, “A big chunk of that cost comes from the time it takes people to recover from an interruption and get back to work.”

Now more than ever, putting your marketing eggs into one “viral” basket is not sound advice for business success.

As marketers trying to reach customers virally, we can safely assume that they are already drowning in viral messaging and that their inbox will only continue to get bigger. What we don’t know is if our audience is using technology to its fullest capacity, or drowning in message overload.

Regardless, this puts the burden of effective communications on the shoulders of marketers. Marketing messages must, therefore, at the very least be:

  • Fully integrated
  • Highly creative
  • Genuine
  • Valuable to customer

This means that a balance between traditional marketing and viral marketing must be constantly analyzed for consistency, functionality and overall success.

The balance between the old and new is important because one is predictable and the other isn’t. There are people that will tell you that it is possible to create a viral campaign that will be hugely successful, but according to David Meerman Scott, author of The New Rules of Viral Marketing, the vast majority of agencies making such claims, almost always fail. Why? Because viral marketing requires luck, good timing, and can’t be forced.

Hence, the need to maintain a traditional marketing campaign in conjunction with all viral attempts. If you haven’t already, meet with the key decision makers of your company and define your “baseline balance.”

Keep in mind, balance is key, but so is agility! Be prepared to fail, make changes, succeed, make changes, fail, make more changes, succeed…and so on!

Photo provided by: intersectionconsulting

April 23, 2010 at 11:57 am 2 comments

An Evening of Eco-Innovations Event

Join us for an evening of eco-innovations.

Learn to work smart, print smart and save smart.

Event Details:

EARTH DAY EVENT

Thursday, April 22, 2010 – 4 to 7 PM

Prisma Graphic located at
2937 E Broadway Road, Phoenix. Get a Google Map

brought to you by:

GREEN LIGHT SPECIAL GIVEAWAYS EVERY HALF HOUR!

Complimentary hors d’oeuvres, cocktails and music.

Please RSVP by Thursday, April 15th – 602 243-5777 or hr@prismagraphic.com

April 19, 2010 at 4:43 pm Leave a comment

Essentials of Call to Action for Commercial Printing Marketing

When it comes to commercial printing, a call to action is an essential marketing concept. Call to action refers to a request made on behalf of the advertiser for the prospect, or potential customer, to do something in regards to a product or service. Basically, an advertiser issues an effective call to action in order to persuade a buyer to move closer toward making an actual purchase. Understanding and effectively employing this concept is absolutely essential to directing a successful marketing or advertising campaign, and a good call to action answers the following question in the mind of the advertisement’s reader: “That’s interesting. Now what do I do?”

Commercial printing applications for the call to action concept are as diverse as the possible mediums for advertising. Web to print applications could include buttons that visitors click in order to begin purchasing a good or service. Web to print applications above all others, in fact, require a sound understanding and implementation of this concept, considering the sheer volume of retail business being done on the internet every second.

In terms of hard copy media, some examples of effective calls to action include instructions for a customer to call an 800 number in order to discuss the product with a company representative. Coupon campaigns in local supermarket pamphlets or direct mailing packets are another effective call to action, as they inspire customers to directly seek out the goods and services that are being discounted. In terms of the internet, every time an advertisement mentions a website to be visited for more information, they are essentially issuing a call to action.

To this end, it is the responsibility of the marketer to drum up fresh and exciting ways to issue effective calls to action to their customer base as well as new prospects. A local business owner could promote a new opening by distributing materials that advertise rock-bottom opening specials so long as patrons come within a certain small window of time.

Successful web-based marketing campaigns have used the full spectrum of today’s available technology to reach customers at home and on the go. Offering free content such as ringtones, pictures or music in exchange for the telephone numbers of customers that SMS or text a certain number via a cell phone is one way that clever marketers are generating current and active customer data.

Specifically to the realm of the web, today the name of the game is free give-away content or service. Many successful sites offer a compelling web or information based service at two simultaneous levels. New users that register using basic personal information are eligible to use the service at a basic level for free, but may be restricted to a certain number of uses per day or bandwidth constrictions, for example. Once they are thusly introduced to the service, customers often opt to pay a flat monthly fee or one time upgrade fee in order to enjoy the full features of the service with all trial restrictions lifted.

April 18, 2010 at 8:53 am Leave a comment

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