Posts tagged ‘marketing’

Prisma Graphic utilizes Web to Print Technology

According to Wikipedia: Web-to-print, also known as Web2Print or remote publishing, is a commercial prepress process that bridges the gap between digital content online and commercial print production. This process allows a print house, a client, and possibly a graphic designer to create, edit, and approve computer-based online templates during the prepress phase. Web to print is a technology to help business owners create a consistent brand image and build loyalty with their clients.

Prisma Graphic as a Web to Print Company

Prisma Graphic is not just a web to print company; with our exclusive Dokshop; but a print empowering company. Dokshop gives business owners control over their image through their print materials and collateral marketing efforts.

By utilizing Dokshop, companies can have their own business printing portal with access from anywhere.

The Dokshop services lets you sign in and create your custom portal with your images and marketing materials. Marketing Directors, managers, or employees can access company approved marketing materials with just a click of the mouse. Choose your template and add your text and we will print it for you and have it delivered to your location. We make web to print easy.

Let us show you how easy it is to set up your custom portal with an online web-to-print demonstration today.

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June 15, 2010 at 1:50 pm Leave a comment

Connect With Customers Through Color

Watched HGTV lately? Color trends come and go in the interior design world, so I thought it would be interesting to see if the print world follows suit. Do you know what colors are currently forecasted to be “hot?” How often do you reinvent your print collateral to coincide with such trends? Is your color palette universal enough to stand the test of time?

Believe it or not, color speaks to people with great emotion. What are your paper products saying to your customers?

“Color trends are not conjured up using a crystal ball. They are the result of much observation of our surrounding natural world as well as the influences that will impact our world in the future,” Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute®

According to Pantone, an X-Rite company, and the global authority on color and provider of professional color standards for design industries, name a few factors that play into the selection of color trends: socioeconomic issues, technology, lifestyles, entertainment, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, the needs, moods, fantasies and aspirations of CONSUMERS!

Eight featured palettes in PANTONE VIEW home + interiors 2010 offers the newest colors and combinations to best express directional themes for 2010. CMYK printing equivalents are ALSO supplied to accurately reproduce the forecasted colors in marketing materials, in-store signs and packaging.

With our unpredictable economy, is it worthwhile to look at our print materials with an eye to color? What do our color palettes need to convey in such economic unrest?

I believe consumers are looking more to the “old days” for a sense of elegance and a return to quality. Making the old new again appeals to our sense of practicality and resourcefulness – qualities which are definitely back in style. Products and services that also connect emotionally have a better chance of appealing to our cautious consumerism.

What SINGLE color do you think can take us back and make us feel nostalgic and secure…Pantone has announced that the Color of the Year 2010 is… PANTONE 15-5519 Turquoise, an inviting, luminous hue.

Combining the serene qualities of blue and the invigorating aspects of green, Turquoise inspires thoughts of soothing, tropical waters and a comforting escape from the everyday troubles of the world, while at the same time restoring our sense of wellbeing.”

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According to Pantone, whether envisioned as a tranquil ocean surrounding a tropical island or a protective stone warding off evil spirits, Turquoise is a color that most people respond to positively. It is universally flattering, has appeal for men and women, and translates easily to fashion and interiors. With both warm and cool undertones, Turquoise pairs nicely with any other color in the spectrum. Turquoise adds a splash of excitement to neutrals and browns, complements reds and pinks, creates a classic maritime look with deep blues, livens up all other greens, and is especially trend-setting with yellow-greens.

Looks like we can’t go wrong with turquoise – add a splash where it works within your current style guidelines. Perhaps your design already has a placeholder for each year’s current color trend. If not, give it some thought!

May 19, 2010 at 7:07 am Leave a comment

The Good Deal Appeal

Gone are the days of freely spending money without searching the Internet for a bargain. Savvy shoppers look for and USE coupons, discounts, freebies, etc. , and often select a product or service with such an “offering” over the competition because of the “good deal appeal.”

If you’re not using coupons in your marketing mix… THINK AGAIN! You just might be missing the entire population of shoppers who key in on coupons while surfing for bargains. Not convinced, go to a search engine, type in your product followed by the word “coupon “ and check out what your competition is doing.

Haven’t you noticed the coupon/promo code box during your Internet shopping? The one that when you leave it blank you feel like you were ripped off , or worse yet, not “special” enough to have access to the mystery code?

Well don’t make it hard for your customers to find your coupons – don’t make your customers work to feel special – go make a snazzy coupon and help your customer choose you over the competition – from a financial standpoint, as well as an emotional one.

Face it, everyone likes a good deal – especially in this economy! I know I like a good deal as a consumer and I really like a quirky idea as a marketer. So figure out an offer you can make that is unique, worthwhile and won’t break your bank.

According to About.com, Over 76% of the population use coupons, according to the Promotion Marketing Association (PMA) Coupon Council. Coupons still work and provide an affordable marketing strategy for small business.

Here’s a few things to consider before creating your coupon:

  1. What can you afford to decrease or give away? What is your budget?
  2. What do you hope to get out of this coupon campaign? Awareness, repeat customers, etc.
  3. Who is your target audience?
  4. How will your coupon be disseminated? WHERE will it be discovered?
  5. How will you know if your campaign is successful?
  6. Is this a job that can be done in-house or do you need professional support?

Check out this site – I randomly selected it based off a coupon savings link and was pleasantly surprised by the real estate give to the Open Box feature promoting 60% off. Also thought the red tag sale button at the top that makes you think you’ll get a great deal, but only today, is also tempting.

So, whether you’re providing a service or product, think in unique terms of what you can afford to GIVE to your customers so that they choose you over your competition. Be smart, be creative and be genuine – everyone knows when they’re getting a good deal or getting snowed!

Image provided by: screwtape

May 18, 2010 at 7:00 am Leave a comment

Something Worth Holding

As gizmos like the iPad and Kindle take technology to new levels of customer comfort, messaging through interactive touch is the new “little black dress.” Thankfully, for tactical –minded people, holding something, feeling its texture, sensing its smell, and evaluating its texture and quality is in fashion.

For those in the print world, this might seem to scream, “Quit taking our beloved paper goods away!” But alas, this is a golden opportunity to take advantage of the romance with touch. Get creative with your print materials. Have a little fun with some redesigns and actually give your customers something worth holding!

Let’s talk specifics. What about your business card design?

Designs are a journey, they connect people. They connect the consumer with the producer through a product or service.

According to fellow blogger Nick Barker,

“Design is all around us – the chair you are sitting on, the keyboard you are touching and the building you find yourself in. Design is at the heart of everything. I believe what makes a good design is a holistic creation right through a product or service. A design should effectively connect the consumer with the product or service.”

(more…)

May 10, 2010 at 12:11 pm Leave a comment

How we React to Color – Tips for Commercial Printing

Even in the wilds of nature, color plays an intensive role in behavior, attraction and aversion. Color is informative. It tells a creature whether or not something is probably safe to eat, as well as whether or not another creature is weakened, sickly or healthy. Color has the power to alter moods. Softer oceanic colors can soothe frazzled nerves, high energy neon colors dazzle and delight the night life crowds, and power colors adorn the workspaces of professionals that understand the profound effect their surroundings can have on their productivity and focus. With so much to be communicated via proper coloration, and with certain tasks being better suited to certain colors, any professional working in commercial printing would do well to put extensive thought into the subtle or explosive messages they are sending with the palette they select for each project.

Successful commercial printing first requires a clear and goal-oriented identification of the overall mood or schema of the project at hand. Publishing with the intent to advertize will usually require a far different set of shades than that required by publishing with the intent to inform. Taking a moment beforehand to clearly define the project goals and intentions will pay dividends down the road in terms of successful and relevant visual themes.

Once the goals are defined, it’s time to choose the best colors for the particular job. Advertizing material, which is always designed to be eye-catching and visually distinct from information surrounding it, benefits greatly from oppositional colors that create strong contrast to the human eye, and thereby increased reactive interest. Notice how often advertizing materials feature dichromatic balloons, banners, or bubbles in yellow and red.

Because these two colors are naturally strong signals for the human brain, due to their wide prevalence in the wild as indicators of food edibility or the shock of blood, they cast a powerful spell all their own upon modern readers. At the same time, their placements on the light spectrum cause them to be mutually enhancing. Red and yellow trimmed informational boxes are even more noticeable than either solid red boxes or solid yellow boxes.

The overall effect achieved by these two colors when synthesized by the human brain is one of heightened attention. Countless other such combinations exist, each with their own varying thematic message. Deep greens, when commingled with dark or soft browns suggest earthy peacefulness, growth and the natural world.

Tinkering with these combinations and allowing time for various color themes to show their ultimate thematic effects can greatly enhance any commercial printing project. Likewise, identifying the target audience of any particular publication and making educated guesses as to their thematic expectations or moods will increase the overall effectiveness of assembled content. Brochures designed to woo potential retirees to a beach community, for example, should display the area being promoted in soft, relaxing, pleasant hues. A mixture between the tranquil blue comfort of sea and sky and the entrancing sherbet swirls of a sunset will strongly deliver the message that it’s time to buy tickets.

April 25, 2010 at 8:32 am Leave a comment

Are All Your “Marketing Eggs” in One Basket?

Email is part of our daily lives and definitely not a fad that is going away. Carefully managing mailboxes and email habits is on every CEO’s mind as billions of dollars are lost in productivity each year.

A typical information worker who sits at a computer all day turns to his e-mail program more than 50 times and uses instant messaging 77 times, according to one measure by RescueTime, a company that analyzes computer habits. The company, which draws its data from 40,000 people who have tracking software on their computers, found that on average the worker also stops at 40 Web sites over the course of the day.
According to a New York Times article, “The fractured attention comes at a cost. In the United States, more than $650 billion a year in productivity is lost because of unnecessary interruptions, predominately mundane matters,” according to Basex. The firm also reports, “A big chunk of that cost comes from the time it takes people to recover from an interruption and get back to work.”

Now more than ever, putting your marketing eggs into one “viral” basket is not sound advice for business success.

As marketers trying to reach customers virally, we can safely assume that they are already drowning in viral messaging and that their inbox will only continue to get bigger. What we don’t know is if our audience is using technology to its fullest capacity, or drowning in message overload.

Regardless, this puts the burden of effective communications on the shoulders of marketers. Marketing messages must, therefore, at the very least be:

  • Fully integrated
  • Highly creative
  • Genuine
  • Valuable to customer

This means that a balance between traditional marketing and viral marketing must be constantly analyzed for consistency, functionality and overall success.

The balance between the old and new is important because one is predictable and the other isn’t. There are people that will tell you that it is possible to create a viral campaign that will be hugely successful, but according to David Meerman Scott, author of The New Rules of Viral Marketing, the vast majority of agencies making such claims, almost always fail. Why? Because viral marketing requires luck, good timing, and can’t be forced.

Hence, the need to maintain a traditional marketing campaign in conjunction with all viral attempts. If you haven’t already, meet with the key decision makers of your company and define your “baseline balance.”

Keep in mind, balance is key, but so is agility! Be prepared to fail, make changes, succeed, make changes, fail, make more changes, succeed…and so on!

Photo provided by: intersectionconsulting

April 23, 2010 at 11:57 am 2 comments

Essentials of Call to Action for Commercial Printing Marketing

When it comes to commercial printing, a call to action is an essential marketing concept. Call to action refers to a request made on behalf of the advertiser for the prospect, or potential customer, to do something in regards to a product or service. Basically, an advertiser issues an effective call to action in order to persuade a buyer to move closer toward making an actual purchase. Understanding and effectively employing this concept is absolutely essential to directing a successful marketing or advertising campaign, and a good call to action answers the following question in the mind of the advertisement’s reader: “That’s interesting. Now what do I do?”

Commercial printing applications for the call to action concept are as diverse as the possible mediums for advertising. Web to print applications could include buttons that visitors click in order to begin purchasing a good or service. Web to print applications above all others, in fact, require a sound understanding and implementation of this concept, considering the sheer volume of retail business being done on the internet every second.

In terms of hard copy media, some examples of effective calls to action include instructions for a customer to call an 800 number in order to discuss the product with a company representative. Coupon campaigns in local supermarket pamphlets or direct mailing packets are another effective call to action, as they inspire customers to directly seek out the goods and services that are being discounted. In terms of the internet, every time an advertisement mentions a website to be visited for more information, they are essentially issuing a call to action.

To this end, it is the responsibility of the marketer to drum up fresh and exciting ways to issue effective calls to action to their customer base as well as new prospects. A local business owner could promote a new opening by distributing materials that advertise rock-bottom opening specials so long as patrons come within a certain small window of time.

Successful web-based marketing campaigns have used the full spectrum of today’s available technology to reach customers at home and on the go. Offering free content such as ringtones, pictures or music in exchange for the telephone numbers of customers that SMS or text a certain number via a cell phone is one way that clever marketers are generating current and active customer data.

Specifically to the realm of the web, today the name of the game is free give-away content or service. Many successful sites offer a compelling web or information based service at two simultaneous levels. New users that register using basic personal information are eligible to use the service at a basic level for free, but may be restricted to a certain number of uses per day or bandwidth constrictions, for example. Once they are thusly introduced to the service, customers often opt to pay a flat monthly fee or one time upgrade fee in order to enjoy the full features of the service with all trial restrictions lifted.

April 18, 2010 at 8:53 am Leave a comment

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