Posts tagged ‘pdf file’

Making the Most of Marketing Dollars, Planning and Prepress is key.

Making the Most of Marketing Dollars, Planning & Prepress Addressed

Although it seems fairly straight forward, there are many decisions leading up to and within each print project that directly affect its bottom-line and overall impact. Proper planning and specific attention to detail can save thousands of dollars. Working with a reliable and knowledgeable print solutions representative is a great start; a partner willing to provide practical solutions to make the most of your marketing dollars.

 The options to save during planning are endless with a little creative flexibility. And, below are just a few examples.

 Removing bleed on an 8.5 x 11 flyer allows for 10, rather than 8, to print at a time and on the same parent-sized sheet; paper is normally 30 to 50% of the total job cost.

 Think about using a self-cover format for multiple-page products. Removing the heavier cover eliminates the cost of an extra press form and may allow the project to fold in-line; every off-line process adds to the bottom line.

When preparing for a direct mail project consider the following:

•            Processing the mailing list(s) in advance will establish the actual quantity needed and potentially reduce waste by 7% or more.

•            Sticking to a maximum finished size of 11.5 wide x 6.125 tall, and staying under 3.3 oz, can save roughly $0.12 per piece in postage; a $2,400 savings with just 20,000 mailers.

•            Fugitive glue dot closures can be applied during the folding process for a small set-up fee, while the wafer seal application adds $17 to $20 per thousand in each direction; new USPS regulations require closures on all “open” sides.

 Once the final specs are established, a second place to prevent additional costs is in the final file set-up and content review stages. Utilizing each software application correctly and carefully reviewing projects before file release are critical steps in this process. Below are just a few examples of ways to retain cost controls.

 Using a document size larger than the actual trim size of the piece, forgetting to include 1/8″ bleeds or building multiple-page products in spreads, rather than single pages, can all add considerable time and costs in to the prepress process.

 Correctly specifying inks, throughout software utilized, has never been more important. Using PANTONE’s COLOR BRIDGE® profiles to establish your 4-color process builds will ensure color accuracy and avoid second and even third rounds of color proofs. To download free support tools, including the latest color libraries and PANTONE® Color Bridge Tutorials visit www.pantone.com. You will be asked to create a user account, then you can click on the “helpCenter” in the menu bar to select the “Color Library Updates” page.

 Running a quick spell check and having an “outside” set of eyes review the overall content, before final file release, will also help avoid costly mistakes. Discovering grammatical and layout issues beforehand will help to keep projects on track and on budget.

 To find out more about minimizing costs or about proper file set-up, please contact a Prisma Sales Representative, or Kyle Cardinal by calling 800 379-5777 or emailing  kylec@prismagraphic.com.

November 10, 2009 at 3:03 pm Leave a comment

The Guidelines for Successful File Preparation for Printing

Preparing Your Project for Print

 

File preparation for heat set webPrisma Graphic preferred file format is PDF/X-1a.  However, most printers will accept PDF files that are created according to the instructions on this site. 

We have a number of tools on our website to creat PDF files from Quark, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, Or Adobe Acrobat.

 

 

Helpful information from Prisma Graphic for form and other materials you will need to prepare your files for printing.

Click here for our white paper on file preparation.

 

October 23, 2009 at 10:11 pm Leave a comment

Top 10 Adobe PDF Golden Rules

The top rulesWhen designing documents we at Prisma Graphic, have our top 10 Adobe PDF Golden rules which we are sharing with you.  If you maintain the following guideline, you will ensure trouble-free integration with an automated workflow.

1.   Always set up your document page size to be finished trim size plus 1/16” on all sides for bleed, even in the case of a document that may not contain a bleed.

2.   Select a color PostScript printer driver (PPD) and print your document to a PostScript file. Black and white print drivers will not contain all the necessary color information for the press.

3.     If you are creating a document that will be incorporating variable data, each page should be a separate PDF document. This is required for imposing variable data documents.

4.      Remember to:

a.      Create Acrobat 4.0 (or higher) compliant files.

b.       Exclude any preset security permissions.

c.       Flatten all transparencies.

d.        Always embed your fonts or create outlines.

5.       Do not use PDFWriter. PDFWriter is intended to be used to produce the smallest viewable files possible, and will exclude most of the elements needed for final high resolution output.

6.       If you are using the Acrobat Distiller PPD file, you must use the PrismaGraphic specifications. This will ensure that printing options have been set correctly for imaging within PrismaGraphic’s automated workflow. (see link for profile)

7.      When working on a Windows platform, you may either:

a.        Use the Adobe PPD to generate a PostScript file. The resulting PostScript file can be stored in any folder as “*.ps” or “*.prn”. The file(s) can then be processed using Acrobat Distiller to create the PDF.

b.         You may use the Acrobat Distiller printer to create the PDF in one pass. The latest Adobe drivers are available online at the Adobe Web site (http://www.adobe.com).

8.         When creating any document for Prisma Graphic, make sure that you are working in the CMYK color mode.

9.           When building the color black, use the following settings to ensure a deep rich black:

a.           Cyan = 40%

b.           Magenta = 30%

c.           Yellow = 0%

d.           Black = 100%

10.        When possible, set your general resolution to 2400 dpi (dots per inch).

a.            Color settings in distiller should be:

                  i.         Color images – 300 DPI (dots per inch).

               ii.          Grayscale – 300 DPI (dots per inch).

             iii.             Monochrome images 1200 DPI (dots per inch).

 For more infomation come to our website at Prisma Graphic

 

October 22, 2009 at 12:00 am 1 comment

The Portable Document Format (PDF)

PDF for printingThe versatile PDF format has become the de facto standard for file transfer. It is a “device independent” software application, and has a completely open system that can be used on a multitude of output devices and media. For instance, it can be used to convey information onto the Internet, in printed format, on cd-rom, or via e-mail without losing image quality or the layout, style, etc. of the document.

Its strength lies in, as the name suggests, the portability of the document it produces. What this means is that a PDF document can be transferred between systems, i.e. Macintosh® to Windows® PC, PC to printer, without being altered. So what you see on the computer screen is exactly the same as everyone else sees. In this way, it can be sent anywhere for remote proofreading, and this consistency can be conveyed to the final printed piece.

Adobe® Systems is the company that developed the PDF file format, and all PDF files can be opened and viewed using Adobe Acrobat® Reader® – a free download application from Adobe (www.adobe.com). PDF is a direct development of Adobe’s own PostScript® page description language that has been, and continues to be, the print industry’s standard output format. For the most part, PDF file format has gained considerable momentum because it addresses the needs of the overall multimedia market in general.

  • Simplified PostScript Code – PDF files reduce the complexities of the graphic constraints found in PostScript files that need to be rasterized by RIP devices.
  • Embedded Fonts – The type characters and instructions for kerning and manipulating Type 1 and TrueType® fonts are placed inside the file so the user does not need the font to view, process or edit the document.
  • Compressed Graphics – File compression can be dramatic with no loss of quality of the image. Vector graphic files can be reduced to 25 percent of their original size, while bitmap graphics can be reduced by up to 75 percent of their original size. All PDF files are scalable (to 800 percent) and printable on PostScript and non-PostScript printers.
  • Forms and Indexing Features – These Enables PDF to serve as a complete Integrated Document Management System.
  • Page Independence – Single pages can be sent to the RIP, rather than the whole document, giving significant workflow benefits in the production process.

Prisma Graphic has many tools available on their website to answer your questions, so you do make the right choice

October 21, 2009 at 5:11 pm Leave a comment


Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 4 other followers

Prisma Graphic Twitter

Prisma Graphic Photos